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Australia records more deaths from Japanese encephalitis virus

On March 18, South Australia recorded its first death from the Japanese encephalitis virus. As a result, three people in Australia have died from Japanese encephalitis since the start of the year.

On March 18, the Australian state of South Australia recorded the state’s first death from Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV).

State health officials say they have recorded four more cases of Japanese encephalitis, bringing the total number of deadly virus cases in South Australia to eight in this outbreak. Five of them are still receiving treatment.

South Australia’s chief medical officer Chris Lease said deaths from Japanese encephalitis had been recorded in early March.

As a result, three people in Australia have died from Japanese encephalitis since the start of the year.

Mr Lease also advised people to strengthen their prevention against mosquitoes, an intermediate species that transmits Japanese encephalitis.

Japanese encephalitis virus spreads in flooded areas in Australia

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), while most people infected with JE have mild or no symptoms, such as fever and headache, 1 in 250 people infected with JE become seriously ill. .

Since February, more than 20 Australian pig farms in South Australia, Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland have recorded the emergence of the Japanese encephalitis virus, forcing the federal government to declare an epidemic. Serious infection.

Federal officials have created an action team of experts on viruses, vaccines and infectious diseases to deal with the current spread of Japanese encephalitis.

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